With Which Countries Did John Of Denmark Set Up Trade Agreements

With Which Countries Did John Of Denmark Set Up Trade Agreements

With the loss of the fleet and Norway Denmark had become seriously the spectator of the large European stage. At the same time, the country had lost its importance as an important ally of Russia. However, Denmark`s geopolitical situation meant that the country was often on the table in Moscow when the Russian government assessed the political situation in the Baltic Sea region. The western flank of the Baltic Sea, the exit routes of Russian ships, was quite open. For the Russians, it was important to control these geopolitical relations because other great powers could conquer Denmark. In addition, the balance of power in the Baltic Sea region has changed rapidly. The new Prussian great power has developed and expanded with a haste that has never been seen in European history. Especially because of a rise in German nationalism that has not been seen for centuries and, secondly, because of the alliance with the Austro-Hungarian empire. The new British attack, the second Battle of Copenhagen in 1807, was a bombing of the Danish capital.

More than 1,000 civilians died and the British put the rest of the Danish navy on board England. By 1807, Denmark and Russia had changed their foreign policy stance, with both countries having been placed on Napoleon I`s side against Britain at the same time. Moreover, this is precisely the reason for the British terrorist attack on Copenhagen in August and September 1807. In addition, this incident led to the outbreak of the Anglo-Russian War of 1807, which ended in 1812 with the Treaty of Erabro. Denmark itself was drawn into the Napoleonic conflicts of the war of 1808-1809, when the Danes and Russians fought on the side of France [3, p. 46-48]. The defeat in the Battle of Hemmingstedt on 17 February 1500 violated John`s image and, in 1501, Sweden renounced him as king. John waged an increasingly bitter war against Sten Sture and his successor Svante Nilsson, and this conflict meant frictions with both the Danish nobility and Hanseatic cities, particularly Lonbeck. In 1509, when the Netherlands played the role of arbiter, Sweden accepted a statement that John recognized in principle as King of Sweden, but he was never allowed to enter Stockholm as long as he was alive and was not re-elected King of Sweden. As early as the 1700s, when Peter the Great built his Baltic war fleet, many Danish sailors, officers and sailors were looking for their new happiness in Russia. The most famous Danish sailor in the Russian service is the explorer Vitus Bering, who mapped much of the Kamchatka Peninsula and proved that Asia and North America were not the same continent.

But the army that characterized migration in the 18th century was replaced in the 19th century by civilian occupations: Danish workers went to Russia to participate, among other things, in the Russian railway network, while Danish peasants and dairies worked with Russian landowners or settled with their own farms.